fresh beans

Fresh Black Coco Beans

containers of dried beans

Heirloom Bean Varieties

dried beans mixed

Mixed Dried Beans

Tierra Heirloom Dried Beans

dried beans

Dried beans have become a winter staple and specialty crop at Tierra Vegetables over the years. After many trials to determine which beans we enjoy and are efficient to grow we are now producing more than twenty varieties that are harvested, dried and threshed and cleaned throughout the summer and fall seasons. Enjoy the variety of our beautiful and flavorful beans, many with heirloom origins and creative traditional uses. Beans are seasonal and our inventory varies, below is a list of the types of beans we grow or have grown in the past.


Anasazi beans

Anasazi

Anasazi is a Navajo word meaning “the ancient ones,” referring to the Anasazi cliff-dwelling Indians who once resided in the four corners region of the United States. Historic settlers then discovered the beans within the ruins of these cliff dwellings during the 1900s. Presently, the beans are still produced commercially in the same lands that the Anasazi used to cultivate them prehistorically. Try them out in soups, stews, chili and baked bean recipes.

Black Badda beans

Black Badda

Otherwise called “Il Fagiolo Badda di Polizzi,” this bicolored bean has been grown in the Polizzi Generosa gardens of Madonie Park in Sicily for two centuries. Round and medium-small, the bean’s name, Badda, a term from the local dialect, refers to its ball-like shape. These beans were smuggled back to the U.S. from Italy when Tierra Vegetables discovered them while attending Terra Madre - a Slow Food International event. Badda Beans are traditionally used for pasta e fagioli.


Black Coco beans

Black Coco

Passed onto us by a grower from Albany, Oregon by the name of Louie Schroyer, this bean is suspected to be of similar strain to the Black Coco bean (due to the bluish tinge, we have been referring to it as Blue-Black in order to distinguish it from other black bean varieties that we have been trial growing over the years). Schoyer was an expert grower of rare and heirloom bean seeds and at the age of 90 began dispersing his seeds and growing information in order to keep these strains alive and available. This is a great black soup bean and is claimed to have a cocoa flavor.

Bolita dried beans

Bolita

Originally brought to the U.S. by the Spaniards, the beans were initially introduced to those natives and settlers that lived alongside the Rio Grande Valley, quickly becoming a favored staple food. The beans evolved into a traditional food ingredient for the Four Corners region of the U.S. Said to be easy on the stomach and similar to a Pinto bean, the Bolita is a southwestern heirloom that is certain to be perfect for soups, stews, chili, and your favorite southwestern bean recipes.


Cherokee beans

Cherokee Trail of Tears

According to Slow Food U.S.A., the Cherokee Trail of Tears bean memorializes the forced relocation of the Cherokee Indians in the mid-19th century during what might be termed an “ethnic cleansing” campaign. This bean was carried throughout this infamous walk which became a death march for thousands of Cherokees, known as the “Trail of Tears.” Despite a dismal though significant history, the shiny, jet-black beans are used with pride in many traditional Native American dishes. Elongated in shape like a kidney bean, they are shiny before cooking and quite dark black in color, retaining their shape with cooking. Use to fill a burrito, use as a base for a bean salad or mix with other colorful varieties.

Flageolet beans

Flageolet

Flageolets were first developed by Gabriel Chevrier in Brittany, France, in 1872, and were noted as a favorite of the famous French chef Auguste Escoffie. Flageolets have always been associated with elegant cooking. The bean became especially famous at the International Paris Exposition in 1878 and chefs of Paris were quick to incorporate the new ingredient. Flageolets have a delicate, thin skin so should be cooked slowly and gently until tender. The reward for this gentle cooking is a spectacularly creamy texture. This is a great ingredient for light, sophisticated recipes. The beans are often paired with lamb and look beautiful when served with leeks in the winter.


Gold Badda dried beans

Gold Badda

Otherwise called “Il Fagiolo Badda di Polizzi,” this bicolored bean has been grown in the Polizzi Generosa gardens of Madonie Park in Sicily for two centuries. Round and medium-small in size, the bean’s name, Badda, a term from the local dialect, refers to its ball-like shape. These beans were smuggled into the United States from Italy when Tierra Vegetables discovered them while attending Terra Madre - a Slow Food International event. Badda Beans are traditionally used for the dish known as pasta e fagioli.

Gold Tepary dried beans

Gold Tepary

The name Tepary is said to come from the Sonoran Desert Native American word pawi, meaning bean. This is the gold-colored Tepary, sweet and delicate. The beans are small, but lend themselves well to any recipe where more commonly known beans are specified (Tepary beans are an entirely different species, Phaeseolus acutifolius versus the more commonly known species, Phaeseolus vulgaris.) Use in soups, make refried beans, salads, try them on their own...be warned that although the bean is small, it does not necessarily cook quicker than other dried beans. Allow a reasonable amount of cooking time despite the petite size of the bean.


Harvey dried beans

Harvey

Well known in the southwestern region of France and the city of Tarbes near the Spanish border, this bean might be referred to as the “holy grail of beans” by some folks. This bean was given to us as seed by a long time customer named Harvey in 2009, hence the name Harvey’s Bean. The 2010 crop was our first with many more to come. traditionally used in cassoulet recipes (and suggested by Harvey himself), let your imagination run wild.

Hutterite dried beans

Hutterite

Often referred to as the Hutterite Soup Bean, this bean was named after the Hutterite religious community that immigrated to the high mountain region of Taos, New Mexico from Austria in the 1760's. With a delicate and buttery taste, this bean quickly became a staple food of the Hutterite people’s sojourn in the U.S. Hutterite beans cook into a thick, creamy chowder with a dense texture. The bean is revered for making fabulous soups.


Jacobs Cattle dried beans

Jacobs Cattle

This is a bean of many names including Jacob’s Cattle, Trout, Coach Dog, Dalmatian Forellen (German for trout’s back), and Appaloosa. Two stories connect the bean's heritage to the Northeastern U.S. One story says the bean arrived in New England with German settlers during colonial times where it quickly became popular in gardens and kitchens alike. Alternatively, legend and lore connect the bean to Prince Edward Island where it was given as a gift to the first white man from the Maine-based Passamaquoddy tribes. Whether native German or American, the bean remains popular and has successfully made its way across the kitchens of our nation for generations. Try this velvety-textured bean in soups, stews, salads, casseroles, or for baked bean recipes. The bean is described as sweet, fruity, rich, nutty and absorbs seasoning and flavors well.

Louisana Red dried beans

Louisiana Red

This is a bean that stands for the tradition of New Orleans and was utilized in the renowned French Quarter, the Louisiana Red has been a great bean for Mondays. Red beans and rice in Louisiana have often been enjoyed on Monday nights with pork bones left over from the previous night’s meal in addition to both Creole and Cajun influences, vegetables and other meats like ham and sausage tossed in. This has traditionally been a perfect dish to stew and brew while women were off doing chores or washing clothes. Prepare beans with onion, celery, garlic, pepper and seasonings of choice. Add your favorite meat for optimal flavors. Mash some of the beans to make their texture creamy. Pair with plain white rice or incorporate rice in with the bean mix. Serve with a bottle of hot sauce on the side to adjust the heat levels.


Marrowfat dried beans

Marrowfat

Sometimes also referred to as White Egg. With a history dating back to the 1800s this is a fantastic heirloom variety and certainly one of our favorites. We have been able to save our seeds for many seasons thereby maintaining a sustainable cycle that corresponds with open pollinated varieties of vegetables (we never have to buy seeds!). Traditionally harvested on our farm as a fresh shelling bean during the summer and fall months, we are now offering more Marrowfats in dried form. Use this rich, plump, egg-shaped ingredient for your soups all winter. They are also great for a beautiful bake or a bountiful cassoulet. Try mashing when you’ve tried all else! It may also be described as a large navy bean if you are seeking something similar to that for your recipe, but we think the Marrowfat is like none other!

Mitla Black dried beans

Mitla Black Tepary

The name Tepary is said to come from the Sonoran Desert Native American word pawi, meaning bean. Papago tribal lingo would use the phrase t’pawi, meaning it is a bean. Tepary beans may also be referred to by other names including tepari, yori mui, pavi, and moth dal. Whatever the color (there are many,) the Tepary is sweet and delicate. The beans are small, but lend themselves well to any recipe where more commonly known beans are specified (Tepary beans are an entirely different species, Phaeseolus acutifolius versus the more commonly known species, Phaeseolus vulgaris). Try using in soups, make refried beans, salads, try them on their own...be warned that although the bean is small, it does not necessarily cook quicker than other dried beans. Allow a reasonable amount of cooking time despite the petite size of the bean.


Montezuma dried beans

Montezuma

Thought to have originated as a variety of beans grown by the Aztec Indians, these heirloom bush beans have been well known in California since the mid-1800s. Also known as "Mexican Red" or "Small Reds". The flavor is mild and the firm texture holds up well when cooked, these beans are popular in southwest cooking to make chili and refried beans as well as red bean and rice dishes.

Nigel's dried beans

Nigel's

Given to our farmer, Wayne, by Nigel Walker himself, of Eatwell farm in Dixon, this beautiful bean arrived at Tierra as a transaction of friendship and a token of what we share with our fellow farmers in the area. Nigel shares use of the bean processing equipment that Tierra utilizes to process these crops. What is the actual name of the spotted and beautiful bean? We aren’t sure…let us know if you have any clues. Try like a Pinto Bean. This bean is sure to be a show stopper and would be great in soups and chili beans alike.


Pebble Tepary dried beans

Pebble Tepary

The name Tepary is said to come from the Sonoran Desert Native American word pawi, meaning bean. Varried in the color, the Tepary is sweet and delicate. The beans are small, but lend themselves well to any recipe where more commonly known beans are specified (Tepary beans are an entirely different species, Phaeseolus acutifolius versus the more commonly known species, Phaeseolus vulgaris). Try using in soups, make refried beans, salads, try them on their own...be warned that although the bean is small, it does not necessarily cook quicker than other dried beans. Allow a reasonable amount of cooking time despite the petite size of the bean.

Petaluma Gold Rush dried beans

Petaluma Gold Rush

Grown for over 150 years by the Azevedo family of Petaluma, this bean was initially grown and marketed in San Francisco during the 1840s when an Azevedo jumped ship from a whaler, instead starting up his very own vegetable ranch. His produce business was later moved to Petaluma, providing the namesake for this bean. Both the Azevedo family and the Petaluma Gold Rush bean are said to have come to the United States from Peru. Gold Rush beans have a full flavor and texture that is both creamy and meaty. Chef Eric Tucker from San Francisco’s Millennium restaurant raves about the pot liquor produced when cooking these beans.


Pinquitos dried beans

Pinquitos-
Santa Maria Pinkies

Pinquitos were passed down to us by a bean grower from Albany, OR, Louie Schroyer. We received a number of our heirloom beans from Schroyer who, at age 90, decided to pass them along to keep the heirloom strains alive. Schroyer gave us two pink beans from his collection and while we are confident that this bean fits the description of the classic Santa Maria Pinquito, it is also possible that it is another bean Schroyer identified by the name Pinkie. The Santa Maria Pinquito bean comes from Santa Maria, California where it has been historically grown and is known as a classic side dish bean, often used in chili dishes and paired with tri-tip. The bean is small, hearty and pink with a dense and creamy consistency, quick-cooking and holds its form well.

Rio Zape dried beans

Rio Zape

History behind this bean is that it was grown by the Anasazi people of the desert Southwest and that white settlers either found or traded for these beans and have grown them since at least the early 1900s. In 1957 and 1960, cave dwellings along the Rio Zape river in Durango, Mexico were excavated and many varieties of maize (corn), beans and cucurbit seeds from circa 600 A.D. were discovered and classified. The purple color of this bean inspires a creative dish. Described by Steve Sando of Rancho Gordo as being similar to pintos, but with a hint of coffee and chocolate flavor. The dark color is retained during cooking and produces a nice, dark "gravy" all on its own. A favorite of our customers as being a hearty bean that ensures a successful dish.


Swedish Brown dried beans

Swedish Brown

Swedish immigrants who settled in Montana about 100 years ago introduced this pale brown bean to the northern United States. When visiting Sweden, Lee enjoyed these beans so much she decided she must share them upon returning to the U.S. Also well known as Svenska Bruna Bonor. A staple in Swedish cooking, these beans are often specifically called for in Scandanavian cuisine. The beans turn honey brown when cooked and have a sweet, slightly nutty flavor. Perfect for making baked beans.

Tiger Eye dried beans

Tiger Eye

This beautifully decorative bean is said to have originated in either Chile or Argentina. It has been named for the colors and markings that resemble a tiger’s eye. A smooth texture and tender skin make this a great ingredient for preparing chili or refried beans. It is also recommended to try using like a Pinto bean or as the foundation of a cassoulet. With such an attractive exterior, this bean would be great to experiment with in all your favorite existing bean recipes.


Yellow Eye dried beans

Yellow Eye

Yellow Eye beans were used in Maine as the most popular bean for baked bean dishes that were traditionally taken to church and grange suppers. It may be referred to as Maine Yellow Eye, Steuben Yellow Eye, Calypso, Butterscotch Calypso, or Molasses Face. Dense, creamy and delicious with a chowder texture. Described by Steve Sando of Rancho Gordo as ham hock’s best friend.